Donor

World Bank

Nutrition for Growth (N4G) commitment to 2020

Reported progress

Assessment

Financial commitments
Milan 2017

The World Bank considers nutrition investments as a key to human capital development and poverty reduction. Under IDA17, which covered three years (mid 2014 to June 2017), the World Bank Group committed $1.9billion in IDA/IBRD resources for nutrition. Over the next two years (from mid-2017 to mid-2019), at least $1.7 billion in nutrition financing has already been identified for delivery across 30 countries in the IDA18 pipeline. This is a significantly increased commitment and represents strong ownership of this critical agenda by both the World Bank and national governments, since IDA is demand-driven by national governments. In addition to IDA and IBRD, key trust fund resources have also been critical to moving the nutrition agenda forward. The $20m Trust Fund from the Government of Japan was critical to increasing our analytical work to support IDA scale-up for nutrition and surpassing our 2013 commitment, as are the $155m of innovative financing resources from the Power of Nutrition (across IDA17 and 18 cycles) co-invested with the IDA portfolio. The $67 million of nutrition-focused resources invested by the Global Financing Facility (GFF) Trust Fund were also a key component of this effort. Child stunting is also included as a Tier-1 indicator for the World Bank Corporate Score card.

Reported progress

No response

Assessment
No response
London 2013

The Bank Group projects that it will nearly triple direct financing for maternal and early childhood nutrition programs in developing countries in 2013-14 to USD $600 million, up from USD $230 million in 2011-12.

Reported progress

Nutrition specific, 2017: n/a

Nutrition Sensitive, 2017: n/a

Assessment
Reached commitment
Basis of assessment

Reported progress in previous Global Nutrition Reports indicates that commitment has been achieved.

Non-financial commitments
New commitment - added in 2015

Commit to reviewing every project in the agriculture pipeline as a step toward ramping up activities that improve nutrition outcomes.

Reported progress

Review of agricultural projects for nutrition-sensitivity is ongoing. In FY19, 60 percent of IBRD/IDA agriculture projects were deemed as nutrition-sensitive (defined as having at least one activity that a) contributes to improving health outcomes, for example, through production of diverse, safe, and nutrient-rich food; income generation that can facilitate access to health services through reducing contamination of water sources; and through the application of labour-saving technologies; and b) is conducted with the explicitly stated purpose of improving nutrition, such as by reducing malnutrition among women and children, reducing stunting, improving individual child/woman or household dietary diversity, improving micronutrient intake). List of NSA activities include:

- Biofortification (growing of, research on, introduction of biofortified crops)

- Food fortification (as part of food processing such as enriched flour milling)

- Explicit reference to the quality and nutritional value of agricultural produce and production

- Improving marketing opportunities for nutritious food including nutrition knowledge activities such as nutrition messages in agriculture extension training (e.g. home economics type training such as food preservation)

- Improved food preservation

- Improving dietary diversity and consumption (e.g. backyard gardens, keyhole gardens, backyard poultry, horticulture, cultivation of pulses, fish ponds/aquaculture)

- Labor- and time-saving technologies (for women)

- Increasing the year round availability of nutrient-rich foods such as fruits, vegetables, legumes, fish, milk, poultry, meat

- Increasing the year round availability of staples (emphasis should be on the temporal aspect: "year round availability")

Assessment
On course
Basis of assessment

Review of agricultural projects is ongoing.

London 2013

Increase by more than 50% its technical and analytical support to countries with the greatest prevalence of stunting or underweight children. Add stunting as a new indicator on the World Bank Group’s (WBG’s) Corporate Scorecard.

Reported progress

No response

Assessment
Reached commitment
Basis of assessment

Reported progress in previous Global Nutrition Reports indicates that commitment has been achieved.