Country government

Zambia

Nutrition for Growth (N4G) commitment

Reported progress

Assessment

Financial commitments
London 2013

1. Increase government expenditure on nutrition to reach the estimated additional US$30 per child under 5 required.

2. Progressively match additional cooperating partner’s resources through new and existing nutrition budget lines.

3. Increase financial contributions by at least 20% annually for the next 10 years.

Reported progress

1. The Government expenditure remained low at approximately US$2 per child under 5 required far below the US$30 per child under 5 required.

2. Government did not progressively match additional donor funding to specific nutrition budget lines. In 2019/2020, Donors spent significantly more on nutrition specific budget lines (Management of Malnutrition, Infant and Young Child Feeding, Growth Monitoring and Promotion, micronutrient programme and procurement of nutrition support commodities) that amounted to on US$6 million compared to Government expenditure of US$300,000 on the same budget lines.

3. Annual financial increases have been increasing at an average of 10% below the targeted 20% annually for the next 10 years.

Assessment
Off course
Basis of assessment

Fewer than half of the individual commitment components are assessed to be on course

Impact commitments
London 2013

Reducing chronic undernutrition by 50% in the next 10 years.

Reported progress

The recent Zambia Demographic Health Survey (ZDHS) of 2018 suggests a gradual, yet consistent reduction in nutritional problems in children in Zambia. A comparison of data on key anthropometric measures in the 2013-2014 and the latest 2018 ZDHS shows that all three nutritional status indices (stunting, wasting, and underweight) have improved in the last 5 years. In this period, stunting decreased from 40% to 35%, wasting decreased from 6% to 4%, and the proportion of underweight children decreased from 15% to 12%. The proportion of overweight children (weight-for-height above +2 standard deviations) remained relatively stable from 2013-2014 to 2018 (6% and 5%, respectively). Zambia has managed to reduce malnutrition by 12.5%, from 40.1% in 2013-2014 to 35% in 2018.

Assessment
Off course
Basis of assessment

Assuming a linear rate of reduction, the stunting prevalence in 2018 (35%) is greater than the required prevalence by this stage (30%) to remain on course with the target of a 50% reduction (20 percentage points) over 10 years.

Policy commitments
London 2013

1. Resolve the human resource and financial gaps in the five key line ministries.

2. Strengthen the governance and coordination mechanisms by establishing direct oversight of progress toward agreed national targets and strengthening the line ministries involved particularly to deliver at community level.

3. Strengthen the functioning and accountability of the National Food and Nutrition Commission of Zambia to adequately coordinate across the key sectors.

Reported progress

1. Additional Provincial (2) and District Nutrition Coordinators (6) were recruited under the National Food and Nutrition Commission in the new SUN districts to coordinate the multisector response to nutrition during third quarter 2020 as a way of bridging the human resource gap in the country, with Officers to serve as District Nutrition Support Coordinators to support rollout.

2. Various oversight and coordination structures exit at national and subnational levels, and these include: Special Committee of Permanent Secretaries on Nutrition; National Multistakeholder Platform (MSP); Provincial Nutrition Coordinating Committees; District Nutrition Coordinating Committee; Ward Nutrition Coordinating Committee; Community Care Groups/Farmer Groups.

3. The Food and Nutrition Act, 2020 is now law and will strengthen multisectoral coordination at all levels, as well as enhance effectiveness for the NFNC as national nutrition coordination point.

Assessment
On course
Basis of assessment

At least half of the individual commitment components are assessed to be on course

Program commitments
London 2013

Progressively encourage the involvement of the private sector to enable access to affordable and appropriate nutritious foods to mothers, children, and other vulnerable groups.

Reported progress

The private sector was actively involved in the Scaling Up Nutrition Business Network (SBN) that has been coordinating the private sector's involvement in nutrition through the Good Food Logo, Healthy Diet Campaigns and other initiatives.

Assessment
On course
Basis of assessment

Reported progress shows that private sector involvement is ongoing