Country Nutrition Profiles

Explore the latest data on nutrition at global, regional and country level. Use our interactive profiles to find out what progress your country has made towards the global nutrition targets. Photo: Asian Development Bank

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Micronesia

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The burden of malnutrition at a glance

In the Micronesia subregion, there has been slight progress towards achieving global nutrition targets. The global targets for diabetes among men and diabetes among women each have one country on course to meet them. However, not a single country in the subregion is on course to meet the targets for overweight among children under 5 years of age, stunting among children under 5 years of age, wasting among children under 5 years of age, exclusive breastfeeding among infants aged 0 to 5 months, anaemia in women of reproductive age (aged 15 to 49 years), low birth weight, obesity among men, and obesity among women. Five countries in the subregion have insufficient data to comprehensively assess their progress towards these global targets.

There is insufficient data to estimate the regional prevalence for anaemia in women of reproductive age in Micronesia. There is also insufficient data to estimate the regional prevalence of low birth weight among infants, exclusive breastfeeding for infants aged 0 to 5 months, and overweight, stunting or wasting among children under 5 years of age.

The Micronesia subregion's adult population faces a malnutrition burden: an average of 23.0% of adult (aged 18 and over) women live with diabetes, compared to 21.3% of men. Meanwhile, 50.9% of women and 40.8% of men live with obesity.

Progress towards the global nutrition targets

WRA anaemia

WRA anaemia

3 No progress or worsening

2 No data

Low birth weight

Low birth weight

No data

Exclusive breastfeeding

Exclusive breastfeeding

No data

Under-5 stunting

Under-5 stunting

No data

Under-5 wasting

Under-5 wasting

No data

Under-5 overweight

Under-5 overweight

No data

Adult female obesity

Adult female obesity

5 No progress or worsening

Adult male obesity

Adult male obesity

5 No progress or worsening

Adult female diabetes

Adult female diabetes

1 On course

4 No progress or worsening

Adult male diabetes

Adult male diabetes

1 On course

4 No progress or worsening

Source: WHO Global Health Observatory 2017; UNICEF/WHO low birthweight estimates, 2019; UNICEF global databases Infant and Young Child Feeding, 2020; UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Joint Child Malnutrition Estimates Expanded Database: Stunting, Wasting and Overweight (July 2020, New York); NCD Risk Factor Collaboration 2016-2017.

Notes: Progress towards the maternal, infant and young child nutrition (MIYCN) and diet-related non-communicable disease (NCD) global nutrition targets is classified as ‘on course’ if the target is met or as ‘off course’ if the target is not met (including ‘some’ progress and ‘no progress or worsening’ country-level classifications). MIYCN targets include anaemia among women of reproductive age (WRA, 15–49 years), infants with low birthweight, exclusive breastfeeding among infants under 6 months of age, and stunting, wasting and overweight in children under 5 years of age. NCD targets include adult obesity and diabetes; raised blood pressure and salt intake are not presented due to lack of country-level data. Obesity and diabetes are based on age-standardised modelled estimates for adults aged 18 years and older, using the WHO standard population; they are reported by sex due to limitations in data availability. Anaemia and low birthweight are also based on modelled estimates. The specific targets set are: 50% reduction of WRA anaemia, 30% reduction in low birthweight, increase the rate of exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months up to at least 50%, 40% reduction of under-5 stunting, reduce and maintain under-5 wasting to less than 5%, no increase in under-5 overweight; and halt the rise in obesity and diabetes prevalence. The methodologies for tracking progress differ across targets. See Methodology for more information on the indicators.

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Diet

Infant and young child feeding

Prevalence of infant and young child feeding indicators

We have no data for this section

Dietary intakes

Dietary intakes of key foods and nutrients in adults aged 25 years and over

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Source: Global Burden of Disease, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, 2020.

Notes: Intakes are reported in grams per day (g/d) for all dietary factors, except for omega 3 fatty acids (milligrams per day; mg/d) and polyunsaturated, saturated and trans fatty acids (percentage of daily energy intake; %E). Intakes are based on modelled estimates for adults aged 25 years and older. Regional intakes are based on population-weighted means of 14 countries and sub-regional intakes are based on population-weighted means of 5 countries. The dietary factors have been selected as those diet components that have a statistically significant relationship with at least one disease endpoint that can be generalisable to all populations. Protective dietary factors include fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds, whole grains, milk, fibre, polyunsaturated fat, omega 3 fatty acids and calcium. Harmful dietary factors include red meats, processed meats, sugar-sweetened beverages, trans fat and sodium. The theoretical minimum risk of exposure level (TMREL) represents the optimal dietary intake that minimises risk from all causes of deaths combined. For protective dietary factors, risk is assessed for intakes below the TMREL; intakes above the TMREL do not further reduce the risk. For all harmful dietary factors, except sodium, TMREL is set to zero, hence risk is assessed for intakes above the TMREL; for sodium, intakes below the TMREL provide no additional health benefit. See Methodology for more information on the indicators.

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Nutrition strategies and financing

National nutrition policies

Implemented national food and NCD policies

Food-based dietary guidelines
5/5
Legislation for mandatory salt iodisation
3/4
Sugar-sweetened beverage tax
4/5
Policy to reduce salt/sodium consumption
4/5
Policy to limit saturated fatty acid intake
4/5
Policy to eliminate industrially produced trans fatty acids
5/5
Policy to reduce the impact of marketing of foods and beverages high in saturated fats, trans fatty acids, free sugars, or salt on children
4/5
Operational policy, strategy, or action plan to reduce unhealthy diet related to non-communicable diseases
4/5
Operational, multisectoral policy, strategy or action plan for non-communicable diseases
3/5
Operational policy, strategy or action plan for diabetes
4/5

Source: Global Fortification Data Exchange, 2019. Available at: https://fortificationdata.org/interactive-map-fortification-legislation. Accessed 30 November 2020; WHO Country Capacity Survey, 2017; WHO Global Nutrition Policy Review, 2016–2017; WHO Global database on the Implementation of Nutrition Action (GINA); World Cancer Research Fund International NOURISHING database; FAO 2020. Available at: http://www.fao.org/nutrition/education/food- based-dietary-guidelines/en. Accessed 30 November 2020; WHO Global Health Observatory, 2020. Available at: https://apps.who.int/gho/data/view.main.2473. Accessed 30 November 2020.

Notes: Number of countries with food-based dietary guidelines in 2018, sugar-sweetened beverage tax in 2017 and all other policies in 2019. Policy is defined as a specific official decision or set of decisions designed to carry out a course of action endorsed by a political body, including a set of goals, priorities and main directions for attaining these goals, including legislation and product reformulation mandates. Strategy is defined as a long-term plan designed to achieve a particular goal. Action plan is defined as a scheme or course of action, which may correspond to a policy or strategy, with defined activities indicating who does what, when, how and with what resources to accomplish an objective. ‘Operational’ describes a policy, strategy or plan of action being used and implemented in the country, with resources and funding available to implement it. ‘Multisectoral’ applies to a policy, strategy or plan of action that involves different sectors (e.g., health, agriculture, education, finance). See Methodology for more information on the indicators.

National policy targets

Inclusion of targets related to the global nutrition targets in national policies

Reduce anaemia among women
4/5
Reduce number of infants born with low birth weight
3/5
Increase prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding in infants 0–5 months
1/5
Reduce child stunting
4/5
Reduce child wasting
3/5
Reduce child overweight
3/5
Reduce adolescent and adult overweight
5/5
Reduce salt/sodium intake
2/5
Reduce raised blood pressure prevalence
4/5
Reduce blood sugar levels/diabetes prevalence
4/5
Multisectoral comprehensive nutrition plan
5/5

Source: WHO GINA, 2nd Global Nutrition Policy Review, 2016–2017.

Notes: Number of countries with target included in national policies in 2017. Any national government-implemented policy, strategy or plan relevant to improving nutrition and promoting healthy diet was considered for 194 countries. Legislation, codes, regulations, protocols and guidelines, as well as non-governmental policies, were excluded. See Methodology for more information on the indicators.

Nutrition intervention coverage

Population coverage of key supplementation and fortification interventions

Data is only available at the country level

Official development assistance (ODA)

Allocation of ODA for nutrition

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Source: Development Initiatives based on OECD DAC CRS, 2019.

Notes: Gross official development assistance (ODA) received or disbursed for basic nutrition (CRS code: 12240) reported in US$ millions (constant 2018 prices) and as percentage (%) of the total ODA received/disbursed. Estimates include ODA grants and loans, but excludes other official flows and private grants. See Methodology for more information on the indicators.

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Social determinants of nutrition

Population composition

Total population, thousands No data
Under-5 population, thousands No data
65 and over population, thousands No data
Rural population, % No data

Source: UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2019). World Population Prospects 2019. Available at: https://population.un.org/wpp/Download/Standard/Population. Accessed: 30 November 2020.

Notes: Estimates are reported in thousands for total population, population group aged 0–59 months, population group aged above 65 years and as percentage (%) for population living in rural areas. All estimates are based on modelled estimates for 2020. See Methodology for more information on the indicators.

Prevalence of undernourishment

We have no data for this section

Under-5 mortality rate per 1,000 live births

We have no data for this section

Population density of health workers per 1,000 people

Type Number Year
Medical doctors No data No data
Nurses and midwives No data No data
Community health workers No data No data

Source: WHO's Global Health Workforce Statistics, OECD, supplemented by country data, 2019. Available at: https://data.worldbank.org/indicator. Accessed: 30 November 2020.

Notes: Number of health workers per 1,000 people, based on modelled estimates. Health worker definition and training vary across countries and human resources tend to be concentrated in urban areas, so inferences may be affected. Physicians include generalist and specialist medical doctors. Nurses and midwives include professional, auxiliary and enrolled nurses and midwives, as well as other associated personnel, e.g. dental and primary care nurses. Community health workers include various types of community health aides, many with country-specific occupational titles such as community health officers, community health-education workers, family health workers, lady health visitors and health extension package workers. See Methodology for more information on the indicators.

Source of drinking water

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Source: WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation, 2020. Available at: https://washdata.org/data. Accessed: 30 November 2020.

Notes: Percentage (%) of population using each drinking water source, based on modelled estimates up to 2017. ‘Safely managed’ refers to using an improved (i.e. by design and construction has the potential to deliver safe water) drinking water source located on the premises, available when needed and free from faecal and priority chemical contamination. ‘Basic’ refers to using an improved source, for which water collection time is not more than 30 minutes for a round trip, including queuing. ‘Limited’ refers to an improved source for which water collection time exceeds 30 minutes for a round trip including queuing. ‘Unimproved’ refers to an unprotected dug well or unprotected spring. ‘Surface water’ refers to drinking water directly from a river, dam, lake, pond, stream, canal or irrigation canal. See Methodology for more information on the indicators.

Type of sanitation facility

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Source: WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation, 2020. Available at: https://washdata.org/data. Accessed: 30 November 2020.

Notes: Percentage (%) of population using different types of sanitation facilities, based on modelled estimates up to 2017. ‘Safely managed’ refers to using improved (i.e. designed to hygienically separate excreta from human contact) sanitation facilities not shared with other households and where excreta are safely disposed in situ or transported and treated off-site. ‘Basic’ refers to using improved facilities not shared with other households. ‘Limited’ refers to using improved facilities shared between two or more households. ‘Unimproved’ refers to using pit latrines without a slab or platform, hanging latrines or bucket latrines. ‘Open defecation’ refers to disposal of human faeces in fields, forests, bushes, open bodies of water, beaches and other open spaces or with solid waste. See Methodology for more information on the indicators.

Annual gross domestic product (GDP) per capita

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Source: International Monetary Fund (IMF) World Economic Outlook database, 2020. Available at: https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/WEO/weo-database/2020/October. Accessed: 30 November 2020.

Notes: Annual gross domestic product (GDP) per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP) in constant 2017 international dollars. Estimates are based on population-weighted means of 2 countries. See Methodology for more information on the indicators.

Population living below the poverty line

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Source: World Bank, 2020. Available at: http://iresearch.worldbank.org/PovcalNet/home.aspx. Accessed: 30 November 2020.

Notes: Percentage (%) of population living on less than US$1.90 or less than US$3.20 per day, based on 2011 purchasing power parity (PPP), up to 2018. Estimates are based on population-weighted means of 2 countries. See Methodology for more information on the indicators.

Country income inequality index

Data is only available at the country level

Gender-related determinants

Data is only available at the country level

Prevalence of female secondary school enrolment

We have no data for this section